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20121201
20121231
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KQED (PBS) 20
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English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
international says greece's handling of illegal migrants make it and i were the member of the european union. a senior official at the ministry told the bbc every year around 130,000 people are arrested when they enter the country illegally. we have more in this report. >> greece is a major gateway for migrants from asian and african countries trying to enter the european union. that they are discriminated against is not new but what this report is saying is that the mistreatment they are suffering now is reaching crisis levels. thousands are detained in an appalling conditions or left vulnerable in the streets where racist attacks happened on it almost daily basis. greece is at the front line of the migration challenge. more than 80% of migrants into into the european union and they do go through greece. thousands end up in detention camps and many of those who are not detained spent days and nights waiting to apply for asylum. other recent months, there has been a wave of attacks on immigrants, a number of them being stabbed to death. it is not just the illegal migrants or asylum seekers f
would love to, thank you. >>> greece has become the gateway to hundreds of thousands of migrants to enter the country, many of them muslims. athens remains the only eu capital without unofficial moscow. now there are plans to build one next year. will the bankrupt companies -- will the bankrupt country have trouble delivering? >> underground, crowded, a legal, the place of worship for muslims and athens. dozens of these poor rooms serve be a huge community. -- dozens of these prior rooms serve out a huge community. >> we respect all religions, but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832, the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of the greek
. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: much of the world paused today to observe christmas. the day brought all the traditional rites of faith for christians and a new urgency to calls for calm in the troubled corners of the globe. thousands of the faithful greeted pope benedict xvi today at his cal bony overlooking st. peter's square. in that timeless setting,
; the impact of austerity in greece; the tea party and the fiscal cliff and the administration's environmental record. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: wall street was down much of the day, but trimmed its losses after news that the house will convene sunday to focus on the fiscal cliff. in the end, the dow jones industrial average shed 18 points to close at 13,096. the nasdaq fell four points to close under 2,986. also today, the labor department reported the number of new claims for unemployment benefits fell this week to the lowest level since march of 2008. president obama is urging dockworkers and shippers to avoid a crippling strike at atlantic and gulf coast ports. it would be the first since 1977. the workers' union contract expires this weekend, and a white house spokesman said today the two sides need to agree on a contract extension as soon as possible. talks broke down last week in a dispute over wages and royalties. the christmas season storm that blasted the south and midwest swept across the upper northeast and new england today and the death
corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbs on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference. they issued a statement today at the end of the gulf cooperation council's annual summit. the statement gave no details. the six u.s. allied countries, also called for swift international action to end the bloodshed in syria. in central asia, a military plane crashed early this morning in kazakhstan killing 27 people including the country's head of border security. the russian-made aircraft went down near a so
friday its newest ipad and ipad mini will hit stores there too. >> susie: greece is one step closer to getting $57 billion in bailout loans. german lawmakers approved the deal reached earlier this week. greece agreed to measures that will drastically reduce its debt over the next seven years. european stock markets and the euro rose on the news. here on wall street, tom, a neutral day on most people here, investors here feeling anxious over the gridlock on the fiscal cliff. the last day of trading for november kind of wimped out. >> tom: yeah, not a lot of price action. lots of volume, though, to end the month, lots of trading volume, but not a lot of price movement here. let's go ahead and take a look at the market focus with the major indices this friday. the major stock indices ended essentially unchanged today even with the rhetoric out of washington. the s&p 500 spent most of the session in the red after the disappointing drop in consumer spending. the index finished with a fractional gain. trading volume spiked at the end of the month. 1.2 billion shares on the big board. just
greece a better grade. it got upgraded to a "b-minus" from "selective default" thanks to reassurances that greece will stay in the eurozone. on wall street, the dow rose 115 points, the nasdaq gained almost 44, and the s&p added 16. our next guest says any reasonable fiscal cliff deal is better than no deal. he's robert doll, chief equity strategist and senior portfolio manager at nuveen asset management. >> susie: hi, bob. nice to see you again. >> thanks, susie. >> susie: so investors and traders really do seem to think that a deal is coming, like our previous guest, roger altman. is this rally all about hopes for a deal or something nore fundamental? >> it is about hope for a deal. the malaise and the lack of confidence and the uncertainty has been pervasive, as you well know, susie. that has held corporations back from doing things, from spending money, and some individuals as well. as roger said a few minutes ago, if we can clear the air with some sort of fiscal cliff deal, i think that does lift the opportunity for the economy to grow a bit. >> susie: what if there isn't a deal?
with almost 12% of people out of work. crisis hit greece and spain edged with a quarter of the people jobless. in austria and germany, the unemployment rate is about 5%. it has been 164 days since julian assange seeked silence in ecuador. he is wanted for questioning in sweden over allegations of sexual assault, but the price tag has cost the taxpayer over $3 million. >> he is the man that shot to fame for selling state secrets when he website released confidential american cables. in 2010, to swedish women accused him of sex crimes. faced with extradition, he fled to the embassy saying the swedish authorities did not guaranteed not to send them to the u.s.. to promote a new book he has written, he speaks out. >> the swedish government refuses to behave in a way that is at all normal, rational, were reasonable. that is why i have been granted political asylum. >> they say he must face questioning. they are outside the embassy 24 hours a day, waiting to arrest him the moment he walked out. it has cost 21 million pounds and counting. he is reported to be eating a lot of take away food, running
fledged banking union and bailout loans for greece. what was being done to prevent another global downturn? that was on queen elizabeth's mind as she visited the bank of england. >> trying her hand at high finance, the queen, put in her signature on a special, a bank note. >> it does not improve much. >> the bank note, worth 1 million pounds, seem like small change as the queen and duke of edinburgh were shown the vaults were gold reserves were kept. there are 27 billion pounds of gold in this fault alone. that is not something you see every day, even when you have been doing this sort of thing for 60 years. has the tour went on, talk turned to more serious matters. the queen once asked why nobody had seen the financial crisis coming. officials launched into a three- part lecture on what caused the crisis. the words like "paradigm" flew across the floor. both the duke and the queen listened intently. finally, it became a two-way conversation, and the queen offered a few thoughts of her own. first, a question about the bankers. >> complacency. >> and then a question about the regulator, the
have been gathering to make flowers and teddy bears. it is a focus of this community's greece. my colleague is up outside sandy hook elementary school with us now. that memorial, i visited yesterday morning and this evening. it is really extraordinary have people have wanted to come there to express their sadness about what happened. >> people are coming here now. they're coming to lay flowers. there are christmas trees here. there are trees for all of the children who were killed and he will not say christmas day. this one is focused on avielle richman. she loved to ride horses. she loved to color her "harry potter"coloring book. these trees are california grown. she had recently moved here from the other side of the country. you can see that people are coming to light candles. they're coming to lay flowers. they are also coming most poignantly with teddy bears. every tree has a group of soft toys for the departed child. this really is a most agonizing week. two funerals took place together. there are many more to come. >> laura, i saw earlier a crossed that had come all the way
in greece this week over the massacre of innocents, but agreeing how to prevent such killings in the future is bound to divide the country for months to come. >> our north america editor reporting. here in washington today, there was a major announcement regarding president obama's cabinet. massachusetts senator john kerry was nominated to be the next secretary of state. after confirmation, the former presidential candidate will succeed hillary clinton to serve as america's top diplomat. so what can we expect from him in that role? for answers, i spoke to the former u.s. state department spokesman. of course, americans united nations ambassador, susan rice, was the top favorite. how effective will john kerry be? >> he has great spirits. in a sense, the obama administration has used him very effectively in the past four years. he was first on the ground in copenhagen with the climate change negotiations. he was inserted into the troubled relationship the united states has with pakistan. he has had effective conversations with president karzai, and he did some yeoman's work when it came to ne
ministers agreed to give greece its next bailout payment of $64 billion. in return, greece has agreed to reduce its debt load by buying back devalued bonds from private investors. the european court of human rights issued a landmark ruling today condemning the c.i.a.'s extraordinary renditions programs. it ruled that a german car salesman khaled el-masri was a victim of torture and abuse for four months at the hands of the c.i.a. el-masri said he was kidnapped from macedonia in 2003, interrogated and tortured at an afghan prison run by the c.i.a. and then dropped on an albanian mountainside when authorities realized he posed no threat. macedonia agreed to pay nearly $80,000 in damages. the u.s. has closed internal investigations into the el-masri case. starting today there should be one less reason to reach for the television remote. a new federal law went into effect banning broadcasters from airing commercials at volumes louder than the programming they accompany. the television industry has had one year to adopt the new rules. violations can be reported on the federal communication
! you're playing your music like crazy and i'm listening to it in greece! what are you doing here? oh john! why aren't you home minding the children? i at least had some business in greece! i had a father that killed every phaedra! phaedra! phaedra! >> that scene actually keeps coming to mind as i try to follow the melodrama in washington that has us heading for a cliff. a fiscal cliff. but are we? or is this, another myth in the making? for some insight, we turn to two seasoned observers both of whose books you'll want to as santa to leave in your stocking. bruce bartlett was an economic adviser to the supply-side icon jack kemp, and to two presidents -- ronald reagan and the first george bush. he got into hot water with his conservative cohorts when he wrote a widely quoted book critical of the second president bush. his most recent work is "the benefit and the burden: tax reform-why we need it and what it will take." yves smith is the founder and editor of the popular blog naked capitalism. after 25 years in the financial services industry, she now heads the management consulting f
a cliff, not greece, but lower growth on a sustained beats, you are talking about when you get up debt there, it can hold back your growth for decades there are other things you can do to make up for it, you can have innovation and other improvements but it is definitely problematic. you know, you start getting up at levels twice where we are, then i think it gets really dangerous, nobody knows where inbetween you really fall off a cliff. i thigh it is hyperbole to say that the united states is going to become greece but it is not hyperbole to compare us to japan and wonder if we get stuck in this slow growth quagmire. europe might be even more in danger of that. >> rose: okay. let's stop right there. do you think that we are at risk of getting stuck in the slow growth quagmire that japan got stuck in, the united states economy? >> well, i would say we are in a mild version of it now, and, you know, we need to do improvements and reforms. i don't think spending money is the solution. there are smart ways to spend it for sure, but i don't buy this idea that bigger keynesian stimulus wi
& poor's upgraded greeces bond rating, europe found a way to muddle through. and the world didn't end on december 21st. >> woodruff: compactedly. which was a lot of people were take very seriously. >> but the mayans maybe not terrific forecasters. >> woodruff: looking back at 2012, michael kberb beschloss, richard norton smith, thank you both. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> and again the major developments of this day, >> suarez: again, the major developments of the day, bargaining on a fiscal cliff deal continued, but house republican leaders opted not to vote on anything tonight. that meant the government will >> the house adjourned for tomorrow so the government is guaranteed to go over the fiscal cliff, at least for the moment. and doctors at a new york hospital announced secretary of state hillary clinton has a blood clot between the school and brain. but they said she's making excellent progress. we're capturing new year's eve celebrations around the world and you can be a part of kwame holman has the details. >> holman: we're tracking instagram with the hashtag "nye" to see how
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)